Posts Tagged ‘architecture’

Clever Small Home Architecture Derived From Site Restrictions in Tokyo

November 22, 2011

By Amazing Architecture | Joseph Rossi

River Side House 5 Clever Small Home Architecture Derived From Site Restrictions in Tokyo

The River Side House is an impressive project designed by Mizuishi Architect Atelier and located in Tokyo, Japan. The small home was constructed on a triangle site and occupies a building area of 29.07 square meters. According to the architects, the structure of the residence includes functionally separate areas, as follows. The first is the dining & kitchen area, situated up the stairs and having high ceilings with a feeling of rise towards the roof top. The living space is low ceilinged and has full-opening windows on both sides of the bay, ensuring a feeling of floating. There is also a generous spare room to the east, for having guests over. The interior arrangements of this residence are minimalist and tasteful. The walls are painted entirely in white, inspiring openness and tidiness. Wooden accents and splashes of color here and there add a happy tone to the design. Do you find this project as intriguing as we do?

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Go Green–with Architecture

October 18, 2011

David Lachapelle, Design Boom

Natural Architecture

The natural environment still manages to fill us with a sense
of awe and amazement. despite the amount of scientific
knowledge mankind has gathered, nature still holds great
mysteries that we may never be able to unravel.
this complexity has continually daunted man. in frustration, we
try to control nature by enforcing order. as a result,
we have distanced ourselves from the earth, even though
our survival is completely dependent on it. we are now trying
to regain our close connection to nature.

There is an emerging art movement that is exploring mankind’s
desire to reconnect to the earth, through the built environment.
referred to as ‘natural architecture’, it aims to create a new,
more harmonious, relationship between man and nature by
exploring what it means to design with nature in mind.

The roots of this movement can be found in earlier artistic
shifts like the ‘land art’ movement of the late nineteen sixties.
although this movement was focused on protesting the
austerity of the gallery and the commercialization of art,
it managed to expand the formal link between art and nature.
this has helped develop a new appreciation of nature in all
forms of art and design.

The ‘natural architecture’ movement aims to expand on ‘land art’
by acting as a form of activism rather than protest. this new
form of art aims to capture the harmonious connection we
seek with nature by merging humanity and nature through
architecture. the core concept of the movement is that
mankind can live harmoniously with nature, using it for our
needs while respecting its importance.

The movement is characterized by the work of a number of
artists, designers and architects that express these principles
in their work. the pieces are simple, humble and built using the
most basic materials and skills. because of this, the results
often resemble indigenous architecture, reflecting the desire
to return to a less technological world. the forms are stripped
down to their essence, expressing the natural beauty inherent
in the materials and location. the movement has many forms of
expression that range from location-based interventions to
structures built from living materials. however all of the works
in the movement share a central ethos that demonstrates a
respect and appreciation for nature.

These works are meant to comment on architecture and provide
a new framework to approach buildings and structures.
they aim to infuse new ideas into architecture by subverting
the idea that architecture should shelter nature. instead,
the structures deliberately expose the natural materials used
in the building process. we see the branches, the rocks and
all the materials for what they are. we understand that these
structures won’t exist forever. the materials will evolve over
time, slowly decomposing until no evidence remains.
these features are intentional, provoking viewers to question
the conventions of architecture. the designers aren’t suggesting
that architecture must conform to their vision, they are just
providing ideas that they hope will inspire us all to rethink the
relationship between nature and the built environment.


‘la tonnelle’ by gilles bruni and marc babarit, 1996


‘ash dome’ by david nash, 1977


‘organic highway’ by mikael hansen 1995


‘bridge in moasi, china’ by edward ng, 2005


‘clemson clay nest’ by nils-udo, 2005


‘weidendom’ by sanfte strukturen, 2001


‘reed chamber’ by chris drury, 2002


‘running in circles’ willow and maple saplings, patrick dougherty, 1996


‘toad hall’ by patrick dougherty, 2004


‘fog pad’ by n architects, 2004


cover of ‘natural architecture’ by alessandro rocca, published by princeton architectural
press, 2007 – all the images featured in this article are taken it.

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