Posts Tagged ‘appraisal management’

MetLife Originates Over $1.6 Billion in Agricultural Mortgages

November 9, 2011

by Emily Phillips via MarketWatch

NEW YORK, Nov 08, 2011 (BUSINESS WIRE) — MetLife, Inc. MET +0.04% announced today that it has originated over $1.6 billion in agricultural mortgages in the first nine months of 2011. MetLife, through its agricultural investments unit, provides mortgage loans on farms, ranches, timberland and agribusiness facilities throughout North America.

"MetLife continues to be very active in the agricultural lending industry," said Robert Merck, senior managing director and head of agricultural investments for MetLife. "Our mortgage production to date demonstrates our expertise in providing borrowers with a reliable and trusted source of financing for the long-term growth and success of their business. At the same time, with the transactions we’ve completed this year, we have continued to further strengthen our high-quality portfolio of agricultural mortgages."

Some of MetLife’s Agricultural Investments unit’s recent transactions include:

Aurora Cooperative — Aurora, Nebraska

— $75 million of a $90 million senior secured loan

— Secured by fixed assets principally comprised of grain handling and storage facilities

— Aurora Co-Op is a grain merchandiser and specializes in handling and storage, as well as a merchandiser and distributor of crop chemicals, fertilizers and energy products

FIA Timber Partners, L.P. – Continental U.S.

— $80 million senior secured, 5.25 year fixed rate loan

— Secured by timberland located across the southern, southeastern, and northwestern United States

— Stands are primarily well distributed age classifications of Southern Pine and Douglas Fir

— Assets managed by Forest Investment Associates of Atlanta, GA

Central States Enterprises, LLC — Heathrow, FL

— $56 million first mortgage, 10 year fixed rate loan

— Secured by grain storage and handling facilities in Northeast Indiana

— Central States Enterprises provides grain and feed handling, merchandising and transportation logistics services

Woolf Enterprises – Fresno & Madera Counties, CA

— Three senior secured fixed rate loans with a combined total of $43 million

— Secured by irrigated field crop land, almonds, pistachios and wine grapes in the western San Joaquin Valley of California

— Woolf Enterprises is a diversified, vertically integrated, multi-generational family business

"MetLife has a deep understanding and knowledge of our industry and worked seamlessly with our banking group to provide us with an optimal structure of long and medium-term solutions," said Aurora Cooperative CFO Robert Brown. "I have worked with numerous financial institutions in my more than 30-year CFO career, and MetLife’s industry expertise was extremely valuable in supporting our financing needs."

Through its agricultural investments department, MetLife oversees a $13 billion agricultural portfolio, which consists of farm and ranch, food and agribusiness and timberland mortgages. MetLife has provided agricultural financing solutions since 1917 and is one of the largest agriculture mortgage lenders in North America. MetLife has agricultural investments offices in Fresno, Calif., Overland Park, Kan., West Des Moines, Iowa, and Bloomington, Ill., as well as a National Timber Office in Memphis, Tenn. For more information, visit http://www.metlife.com/ag .

 

 

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Obama Offers Mortgage Relief on Western Trip

October 25, 2011

Obama, in first leg of three-day Western trip, offers mortgage relief in struggling Nevada.

Jim Kuhnhenn, via Associated Press

LAS VEGAS (AP) — President Barack Obama offered mortgage relief on Monday to hundreds of thousands of Americans, his latest attempt to ease the economic and political fallout of a housing crisis that has bedeviled him as he seeks a second term.

"I’m here to say that we can’t wait for an increasingly dysfunctional Congress to do its job," the president declared outside a family home in Las Vegas, the epicenter of foreclosures and joblessness. "Where they won’t act, I will."

Making a case for his policies and a new effort to circumvent roadblocks put up by Republican lawmakers, Obama also laid out a theme for his re-election, saying that there’s "no excuse for all the games and the gridlock that we’ve been seeing in Washington."

"People out here don’t have a lot of time or a lot of patience for some of that nonsense that’s been going on in Washington," he said.

The new rules for federally guaranteed loans represent a recognition that measures the administration has taken so far on housing have not worked as well as expected.

His jobs bill struggling in Congress, Obama tried a new catchphrase — "We can’t wait" — to highlight his administrative initiatives and to shift blame to congressional Republicans for lack of action to boost employment and stimulate an economic recovery.

Later in the week, Obama plans to announce measures to make it easier for college graduates to pay back federal loans. Such executive action allows Obama to address economic ills and other domestic challenges in spite of Republican opposition to most of his proposals.

While Obama has proposed prodding the economy with payroll tax cuts and increased spending on public works and aid to states, he has yet to offer a wholesale overhaul of the nation’s housing programs. Economists point to the burst housing bubble as the main culprit behind the 2008 financial crisis. Meanwhile, the combination of unemployment, depressed wages and mortgages that exceed house values has continued to put a strain on the economy.

While the White House tried to avoid predicting how many homeowners would benefit from the revamped refinancing program, the Federal Housing Finance Agency estimated an additional 1 million people would qualify. Moody’s Analytics say the figure could be as high as 1.6 million.

Under Obama’s proposal, homeowners who are still current on their mortgages would be able to refinance no matter how much their home value has dropped below what they still owe.

"Now, over the past two years, we’ve already taken some steps to help folks refinance their mortgages," Obama said, listing a series of measures. "But we can do more."

At the same time, Obama acknowledged that his latest proposal will not do all that’s not needed to get the housing market back on its feet. "Given the magnitude of the housing bubble, and the huge inventory of unsold homes in places like Nevada, it will take time to solve these challenges," he said.

In spelling out the plan to homeowners in a diverse, working-class Las Vegas neighborhood, Obama chose a state that provides the starkest example of the toll the housing crisis has exacted from Americans. One in every 118 homes in the state of Nevada received a foreclosure notice in September, the highest ratio in the country, according to the foreclosure listing firm RealtyTrac.

Obama visited the home of Jose and Lissette Bonilla, two grocery store workers whose house was refurbished under a program paid for by the original 2009 economic stimulus plan. The program was designed to stabilize communities hit by foreclosures or abandonment. Lissette Bonilla said she told the president that without his stimulus plan, the five members of her family would still be living in a one-bedroom apartment.

Presidential spokesman Jay Carney criticized Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney for proposing last week while in Las Vegas that the government not interfere with foreclosures. "Don’t try to stop the foreclosure process," Romney told the Las Vegas Review-Journal. "Let it run its course and hit the bottom."

"That is not a solution," Carney told reporters on Air Force One. He said Romney would tell homeowners, "`You’re on your own, tough luck.’"

The president also was using his visit to Las Vegas to promote a $15 billion neighborhood revitalization plan contained in his current jobs proposal that would help redevelop abandoned and foreclosed properties and stabilize affected neighborhoods.

The Nevada stop was the first leg of a three-day tour of Western states, blending his pitch for boosting the economy with an aggressive hunt for campaign cash.

From Nevada, Obama will head for the glamor of Hollywood and the homes of movie stars Melanie Griffith and Antonio Banderas and producer James Lassiter for some high-dollar fundraising. On Tuesday, he will tape an appearance on "The Tonight Show" with Jay Leno. He will also raise money in San Francisco and in Denver.

Before the president addressed his mortgage refinancing plan, he attended a fundraiser at the luxurious Bellagio hotel, offering a sharp contrast between well-to-do who are fueling his campaign and the struggling homeowners hoping to benefit from his policies.

The mortgage assistance plan by the Federal Housing Finance Agency will help borrowers with little or no equity in their homes, many of whom are stuck with 6 or 7 percent mortgage rates, to seek refinancing and take advantage of lower rates. The FHFA plans to remove caps that had allowed homeowners to refinance only if they owed up to 25 percent more than their homes are worth.

The refinancing program is being extended until the end of 2013. It was originally scheduled to end in June 2012.

The administration’s incremental steps to help homeowners have prompted even the president’s allies to demand more aggressive action.

Rep. Dennis Cardoza, a moderate Democrat from California, gave voice to Democratic frustration on the housing front last week when he announced his decision not to seek re-election, blaming the Obama administration directly for not addressing the crisis.

"I am dismayed by the administration’s failure to understand and effectively address the current housing foreclosure crisis," Cardoza said in a statement that drew widespread attention. "Home foreclosures are destroying communities and crushing our economy, and the administration’s inaction is infuriating."

Obama’s new "We can’t wait" slogan is his latest in a string of stump-speech refrains he hopes will pressure Republicans who oppose his $447 billion jobs package. He initially exhorted Congress to "Pass this bill!" then demanded "I want it back," all in the face of unanimous Republican opposition in the Senate, though even some Democrats were unhappy with the plan.

Obama has now agreed to break the proposal into its component parts and seek congressional approval one measure at a time. The overall proposal would increase taxes on millionaires, lower payroll taxes on workers and businesses for a year, pay for bridge, road and school construction projects, and help states and local governments retain teachers and emergency workers.

The proposals with the best chance of passage are the payroll tax cuts and extensions in jobless insurance to the long-term unemployed.

Countering Obama’s criticism, GOP leaders say the sluggish economy and stubbornly high unemployment rate are the result of failed Obama administration policies.

"It’s another day in the campaign life of President Obama, and he’s bringing his re-election tour to Nevada, ground zero for the damaging effects of his failed economic policies," Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus said Monday.

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Strange Houses & Weird Homes

October 20, 2011

A Home Can Be So Much More Than A House

via You Live Where

house507a

This house sure is a doozy, or at least the fall from it is. The archway at the bottom, while sacrificing some stability, is a nice touch. Do you think that the designer of this house likes roofs? As if this house needed to be more top-heavy. My real question is: Where is the electricity coming from to operate that lift? I imagine that it would be a little windy all the way up there. A great little detail that just proves the amazing things people can do with Photoshop these days.

 

 

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The Newest Threat to Home Price

October 18, 2011

Janice Revell, Fortune Magazine

FORTUNE — The rancorous debate about how to address our escalating national debt has dominated the conversation in Washington lately. What isn’t getting much attention inside the Beltway — but should — is a looming event that could have major consequences not only for your home’s value but also for the overall economic recovery. Barring last-minute action by Congress, upscale housing is about to take another punch to the solar plexus — just as it’s struggling to stabilize.

At issue are the limits for so-called conforming mortgage loans that can be bought or guaranteed by Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and the Federal Housing Administration. These mortgages have the implied backing of the U.S. government, which lowers their interest rates and down payment requirements. Back in 2008, at the height of the financial crisis, Congress temporarily hiked the conforming loan limit from $417,000 to $729,750 in affluent areas to boost the flailing housing market.

On Oct. 1, those higher limits are slated to drop back down again in expensive markets nationwide — ranging anywhere from $483,000 in counties like Monterey, Calif., to $625,500 in cities like New York and Washington. As a result, about 1.4 million homes will be pushed out of eligibility for lower-rate conforming loans, according to the National Association of Home Builders. Homeowners looking to buy or refinance those properties will instead have to take out "jumbo" mortgages," which require a much larger down payment — generally 20% to 30%, compared with the typical 10% for conforming loans — and carry interest rates that are typically half to three-quarters of a percentage point higher.

The upshot? More downward pressure on prices in high-end markets. The new loan limits will affect approximately 8% of the total U.S. housing market, according to industry estimates, with particularly significant impact across the Northeast and California, as well as parts of Florida and Illinois. (You can find local market specifics at fhfa.gov.) But everyone should take heed: If expensive homes stop selling, then prices for the houses under them will feel the pressure too.

Indeed, while many experts support the idea of weaning the jumbo mortgage market off government financing, they worry about making the move while the housing sector is still trying to clear excess inventory. "Reducing the conforming loan limits will test whether private lenders are willing and able to step up, but doing so this year may be premature," says Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody’s Analytics. "The cost to the housing market and economy of a misjudgment would be high."

There’s speculation that President Obama will propose a major housing-related stimulus in the coming weeks as part of a broader economic plan. Whether that involves extending the conforming loan limits is anyone’s guess at this point. But stay tuned: You’ll feel the impact of this high-end housing issue either way.

The Newest Threat to Home Price

October 18, 2011

Janice Revell, Fortune Magazine

FORTUNE — The rancorous debate about how to address our escalating national debt has dominated the conversation in Washington lately. What isn’t getting much attention inside the Beltway — but should — is a looming event that could have major consequences not only for your home’s value but also for the overall economic recovery. Barring last-minute action by Congress, upscale housing is about to take another punch to the solar plexus — just as it’s struggling to stabilize.

At issue are the limits for so-called conforming mortgage loans that can be bought or guaranteed by Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and the Federal Housing Administration. These mortgages have the implied backing of the U.S. government, which lowers their interest rates and down payment requirements. Back in 2008, at the height of the financial crisis, Congress temporarily hiked the conforming loan limit from $417,000 to $729,750 in affluent areas to boost the flailing housing market.

On Oct. 1, those higher limits are slated to drop back down again in expensive markets nationwide — ranging anywhere from $483,000 in counties like Monterey, Calif., to $625,500 in cities like New York and Washington. As a result, about 1.4 million homes will be pushed out of eligibility for lower-rate conforming loans, according to the National Association of Home Builders. Homeowners looking to buy or refinance those properties will instead have to take out "jumbo" mortgages," which require a much larger down payment — generally 20% to 30%, compared with the typical 10% for conforming loans — and carry interest rates that are typically half to three-quarters of a percentage point higher.

The upshot? More downward pressure on prices in high-end markets. The new loan limits will affect approximately 8% of the total U.S. housing market, according to industry estimates, with particularly significant impact across the Northeast and California, as well as parts of Florida and Illinois. (You can find local market specifics at fhfa.gov.) But everyone should take heed: If expensive homes stop selling, then prices for the houses under them will feel the pressure too.

Indeed, while many experts support the idea of weaning the jumbo mortgage market off government financing, they worry about making the move while the housing sector is still trying to clear excess inventory. "Reducing the conforming loan limits will test whether private lenders are willing and able to step up, but doing so this year may be premature," says Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody’s Analytics. "The cost to the housing market and economy of a misjudgment would be high."

There’s speculation that President Obama will propose a major housing-related stimulus in the coming weeks as part of a broader economic plan. Whether that involves extending the conforming loan limits is anyone’s guess at this point. But stay tuned: You’ll feel the impact of this high-end housing issue either way.

Quiz: Am I Ready to Buy?

October 18, 2011

Carla Hill, Yahoo Real Estate

There are lots of eager would-be buyers out there. It’s no wonder why! The market currently offers many ideal buying conditions. Interest rates are still at historic lows (for those with excellent credit). Home prices are extremely affordable when compared to area median incomes. There is a large supply of homes available in most markets (more homes to choose from and buyer advantage at negotiations).

Yet, the questions remains. Are you ready to buy? Take a moment to answer this ten question quiz: Am I Ready to Buy?

1. What is your credit score? (a) less than 620; (b) between 730 and 850; (c) between 620 and 730.

2. Do you have cash for a 20 percent down payment? (a) how much?; (b) yes; (c) not yet, but we’re working on it.

3. Do you have cash totaling an 8-month emergency fund? (a) I live month to month; (b) we have funds to cover 8 months of expenses; (c) we only have savings to cover a few months.

4. Have you been pre-approved for a mortgage? (a) I figured I’d find the house I like first; (b) Yes, and I have a copy of the letter; (c) I played around with forms online.

5. Is your job: (a) temporary, part-time; (b) full-time and secure; (c) full-time, but our company is experiencing lay-offs.

6. Do you plan on staying in your current city for the next 3 to 5 years? (a) I won’t be here for that long; (b) Yes, most definitely; (c) I’m not sure.

7. Have you worked on buyer budgets? (a) I don’t have time to do frivolous budgets; (b) I have a spreadsheet showing different scenarios; (c) I’ve worked up a few, but haven’t spent much time.

8. How much space do you need? (a) I want a mansion. I’ll take nothing less. (b) We know within about 500 square feet; (c) we’ve given it some thought, but aren’t sure.

9. Are you and your spouse or partner on the same page? (a) it’s my way or the highway; (b) we’ve had several lengthy discussions and agree on most points; (c) we’ve talked, but have very different ideas.

10. Why do you want to buy? (a) I want a place i can show off; (b) I want stability for my family; (c) I want to be able to decorate like I want!

If you answered mostly a’s, then our experts recommend you take some time to get your finances in squeaky clean order before proceeding. Homeownership is a big financial responsibility, and with an unemployment rate over 9.0 across much of the country, it’s important that you have funds in place to take care of yourself and your family before you you buy.

If you answered mostly b’c, congratulations! You sound like a prime candidate for homeownership. Be sure to contact your local Realtor for advice on the next step.

If you answered mostly c’s, you are very close to being ready to buy. Take the next few months to check over your credit report and fix any errors. Talk to banks and lenders and see what rates you qualify for. Start putting buying at the forefront of your mind and your future planning. Make it a priority and it’ll happen!

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